Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Oxford Vaccine Group researchers have begun recruiting for the next phase in human trials of a COVID-19 vaccine in human volunteers.

The phase I trial in healthy adult volunteers began in April. More than 1,000 immunisations have been completed and follow-up is currently ongoing.

The next study will enrol up to 10,260 adults and children and will involve a number of partner institutions across the country.

The phase II part of the study involves expanding the age range of people the vaccine is assessed in, to include a small number of older adults and children:

• Aged 56-69
• Aged over 70
• Aged between 5-12 years

For these groups, researchers will be assessing the immune response to the vaccine in people of different ages, to find out if there is variation in how well the immune system responds in older people or children.

The phase III part of the study involves assessing how the vaccine works in a large number of people over the age of 18. This group will assess how well the vaccine works to prevent people from becoming infected and unwell with COVID-19.

Adult participants in both the Phase II and Phase III groups will be randomised to receive one or two doses of either the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine or a licensed vaccine (MenACWY) that will be used as a ‘control’ for comparison.

ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 is made from a virus (ChAdOx1), which is a weakened version of a common cold virus (adenovirus) that causes infections in chimpanzees, that has been genetically changed so that it is impossible for it to replicate in humans.

Read more on the University of Oxford website

Similar stories

Coronavirus vaccination linked to substantial reduction in hospitalisation, real-world data suggests

COVID-19

The first study to describe the effects in real-world communities of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine has been reported in a pre-print publication today, showing a clear reduction in the risk of hospitalisation from COVID-19 amongst those who have received the vaccine.

Oxford University extends COVID-19 vaccine study to children

COVID-19 Research

The University of Oxford, together with three partner sites in London, Southampton and Bristol, is to launch the first study to assess the safety and immune responses in children and young adults of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine.

World Health Organization experts provide guidance on use of the Oxford vaccine

COVID-19 Research

WHO SAGE says Oxford's coronavirus vaccine is safe and likely to be efficacious in older adults, and recommends its use in this age group.

Oxford leads first trial investigating dosing with alternating vaccines

COVID-19 Research

The Oxford Vaccine Group is to lead the first trial to explore alternating different COVID-19 vaccines, to explore the potential for flexibility in delivery and look for clues as to how to increase the breadth of protection against new virus strains.

Oxford University vaccine developer joins day of vaccinations at the Kassam Stadium

COVID-19

Today, Andrew Pollard, Professor of Pediatric Infection and Immunity at the University of Oxford, and chief investigator of the trials of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine, volunteered his time to help deliver live-saving Covid vaccinations at the newly opened NHS Vaccine Centre at the Kassam Stadium, Oxford.