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The Oxford Vaccine Group, part of University of Oxford, gave 99 volunteers a drink laced with live Salmonella Typhi bacteria a month after vaccinating them. Between 40% and 50% of the volunteers for the trial were students, Healthcare professionals were allowed to take part if they were not in patient-facing jobs or if they were willing to take around 3-4 weeks off work to be infected

A third had been vaccinated with Typbar-TCV, a new conjugate typhoid vaccine, a third with established vaccine Typhim Vi and the rest with meningitis vaccine Menveo, which does not protect against typhoid. Neither the volunteers nor the doctors carrying out the injections knew who was getting which vaccine.

The volunteers were monitored by staff during daily visits to its centre at Oxford’s Churchill Hospital, and had 24-hour access to advice. When they showed signs of contracting typhoid, or after 14 days, they received a course of antibiotics to cure them.

Oxford Vaccine Group is now analysing the data, with results to be announced during 2017 (Read More ....)

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