BACKGROUND: Genomic and transcriptomic studies underpin much investigation in biology and should be included routinely in clinical trials such as vaccine studies to provide new insight into the development of immunity and the genetic basis for adverse reactions. Interest in collecting and storing genetic material for subsequent high-throughput meta-analyses has increased substantially in recent years. Participants in clinical trials represent an important and invaluable source of clinical material and data. METHODS: Here, the experience of a single center in obtaining informed consent for the collection and long-term storage of genetic material from children, adolescents and adults, involved in clinical vaccine trials is presented and discussed. RESULTS: In 11 completed vaccine studies involving almost 3000 individuals, high rates of consent (in excess of 96%) for biobanking and future genetic testing were obtained. Rates were high for participants from all age groups; however, there was a significant increase toward greater uptake by older study participants. CONCLUSIONS: These high acceptance rates demonstrate that participants (and parents of young children) in vaccine studies are willing to consent and engage in genetic research, which provides support for routinely collecting genetic material in research involving healthy participants such as clinical vaccine trials.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.03.070

Type

Journal article

Journal

Vaccine

Publication Date

07/06/2013

Volume

31

Pages

2744 - 2748

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Biological Specimen Banks, Child, Clinical Trials as Topic, DNA, Female, Genetic Testing, Humans, Infant, Informed Consent, Male, Parents, Retrospective Studies, Vaccines