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People who oppose vaccination – the so-called “anti-vaxxers” – are often thought to be the reason for low vaccination rates. The truth is, anti-vaxxers don’t wholly explain low vaccination rates. The influence of the movement is often exaggerated and does not properly explain a complex situation.

Two main reasons point to why people who have anti-vaccine beliefs and attitudes are not the sole cause of low vaccination. 

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Samantha Vanderslott, Department of Paediatrics. 

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.

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